recent interviews

contributors

Inside 'Pantheon' by Hamish Steele

Inside 'Pantheon' by Hamish Steele

Cartoonist and animator Hamish Steele retells the tale of the ancient Egyptian gods.  Although drawn in a light-hearted style reminiscent of a wholesome cartoon, the book is decidedly explicit, incredibly funny and actually quite educational.

---

frontpage_2_860.jpg

This isn't your grade school history class version of ancient Egypt. Some of the character's names may sound familiar and you've heard of the triumphs and downfalls of these gods before, but most lessons will have left out all the ejaculating, dismemberment and the technicolor scorpion street gang. As ridiculous as some of the content in Pantheon is, it's really does stem from some of the historical truths of these elaborate stories.

In the beginning, a pyramid rose from the sea. From the tip of that pyramid blossomed a lotus, which upon blooming, let loose our Earth's sun. The sun itself in turn became the first god, Atum. Responsible for all creation, Atum began by ejaculating some additional gods into existence. These gods had children (so much incest, literally constant incest) who became the pantheon of Egyptian gods we know from myth and lore like Osiris, Anubis, Set, Nephthys and more.

What begins as the tale of Osiris versus his brother Set becomes a multi-generational family saga, heavily involving his wife/sister Isis and later his son Horus, the product of copulation between a deceased Osiris with a magical golden dong and a half bird/half human version of Isis. Horus' brawn is equally matched by his uncle Set's cunning and use of dirty magical semen. The battle for the pantheon remains exciting throughout the book and you learn to appreciate the indelibly goofy quirks of each characters, even minor ones.

pantheon_hamish_steele_nobrow_press_02.jpg

If you manage to look past the crotch-kicking on the cover of Pantheon and assume that due to it's art style that this is a children's book, you are immensely incorrect. Steele's cartoony drawing style is reminiscent of a Matt Groening animated series in the sense that it remains light while being able to convey real character emotions, drama and violence. In addition to drawing comics, Steele has a background in animation, which leads a cinematic view and sense to Pantheon.

You might think you knew enough about the Egyptian gods, but Pantheon proves you wrong. It gives you a firmer grasp of the characters and their motivations regardless of the humor mixed throughout. As ridiculous as so many of the plot beats are, they fit convincingly among the storytelling because honestly, how much more ridiculous can feuding half animal/half immortal gods be? Hamish Steele proves that they can be much more ridiculous than you ever imagined, but provides some serious laughs and beautiful illustrations along the way.

---

Pantheon is available now via Nobrow Press. You can also find Hamish Steele's personal website at this link which showcases his comics work in addition to other projects. 

New Releases: September 6th, 2017

New Releases: September 6th, 2017

Interview: Lane Milburn

Interview: Lane Milburn